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How to Derail Your Attorney (part 3 of 4)

Continuing our 4-part series, the following are some ways you can quickly derail your attorney from effectively representing you and your interests.

5. Unrealistic Expectations

Your attorney is there to fight for you and your best interests, but that doesn’t always mean you are sure to win everything. No family law matter is a guarantee, so although your attorney is there to do their best, they simply can’t foresee the future.

An experienced attorney should prepare you for either possible outcome throughout your case. They will most likely also give you their opinion on what a fair resolution could be, as well as discuss what your rights are.

Often times, even when an attorney is clear with their client about what to expect, the client has their mind set on a different horizon. While shooting for the stars isn’t necessarily a bad idea, you can’t expect to land in the stars every time. If your attorney offers their feedback on what you can expect, listen. Prepare yourself for any outcome your case may throw your way.

6. Not Paying For Services

Litigation can be an expensive process, but it can also be a process that is well worth the cost.

While your attorney is probably understanding of your financial situation, their patience will have limits. The law firm you have retained is still a business, and as such, they must be paid for the services they provide. Having the mindset that you don’t need to pay your attorney due to the status of the case or because it’s more important for you to take a cruise this summer is not appropriate.

Make paying your attorney a priority. If you are having problems keeping your account paid, it is best to talk to your attorney about payment options, don’t avoid the problem.

7. Misinterpreting Your Role

You may not understand your role in your case, especially if this is your first time going through the litigation process. It can be difficult for a client to know how involved the attorney expects them to be.

In most cases, the attorney is consistently working in the background and will reach out to you with requests to review documents, obtain documents, clarify information, etc. Although it’s normal to not be in touch with your attorney on a weekly basis, you shouldn’t be in the dark either. Don’t be afraid to contact your attorney’s office and ask what the status is or request a strategy meeting.

Another part of understanding your role is understanding that you may work with staff throughout the case. It’s not uncommon for the lead attorney on your case to require the assistance of an associate attorney or even a paralegal. If you refuse to work with these individuals, your case may come to a screeching halt. You wouldn’t expect to go to a doctor’s office and have the doctor do the work of a nurse. Having support staff helps to keep your case on track.

At Burton Law Firm, we have the knowledge and experience to assist you in your family law case. We are results driven and are passionate about family law. Contact us today to schedule a consultation with an attorney to discuss your case.

Continue to part 4 of “How to Derail Your Attorney.”

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